buernorkie

these are my souvenirs, the memory of a lifetime.

petitsirena:

death toll for palestine at time of indefinite ceasefire: 2,139 (almost all civilians, almost 500 of them children)

death toll for israel at time of indefinite ceasefire: 69 (64 of these soldiers)

it will never, ever make sense to me that anyone could support israel through this

Such openness to the concept of radical love – a love that erases chains and destroys boundaries to community – is not a devaluation of the Gospel but an embracing of Gospel as grace, love, and mercy. It is not an atonement that requires hell, but is a gracious, beautiful love that focuses on heaven. It is a love that refocuses us on justice – a love that cannot exist without justice – and a love that focuses on accepting the communities and people that God has created. Rather than trying to figure out the “right” way to live, the umbrella of radical love that queer theology creates allows room for our differences and indeed embraces them.

karnythia:

gonna-do-not-wanna-do:

theroguefeminist:

elliedoh:

So when Miley Cyrus or Katy Perry bring black girls on stage, dance with them, acknowledge their figures- it’s offensive and appropriating. But, when Nicki Minaj makes an entire video focusing around black girl’s asses and asserts her power, reduces these women to objects and flaunts her authority it’s YAAASSSSS NICKI SERVE IT. Is that because she’s black? So it’s okay for people of the same race to dance with each other but someone who does not share the same levels of melanin enters the picture, they’re doing something wrong? …idgi 

You’re completely ignoring context. In Lily Allen’s Hard out Here video, she literally says, “I don’t shake my ass cause I have a brain” as Black women shake their asses in her video. She is literally degrading the Black women who shake their asses in the media. The song also uses references to Black rappers (i.e. the title of the song referencing the rap song “Hard out Here for a Pimp” and her lyric “bragging ‘bout my cars or talking ‘bout my chains”), suggesting that Black rappers are more sexist than white male musicians (which isn’t true, there’s lots of sexism in all music genres) and also suggest the source of sexism in the music industry is Black people (Black male rappers and twerking Black female dancers).
In contrast, Nicki Minaj is reclaiming a song (Baby Got Back) that was made by a Black male rapper who celebrated (but also objectified) Black female bodies. Throughout her song, Nicki raps like a man would, talking about her sexual conquests with men and the size of their dicks, almost as a way of doing to men what they have done to women (objectifying their dicks as Sir Mix A Lot objectified Black women’s asses and many other men objectify women’s vaginas). She also brags about her sexual prowess and stays in control and aggressive in the video (she goes as far as cutting a banana representing a dick and slapping Drake’s hand away—the video critiques the male gaze). The target of mockery and disparagement in Nicki’s video is men and the male gaze, and the video works to reclaim agency from it.
In what way is Nicki asserting power over her dancers? In her video, she twerks along side her back up dancers and dances with them and interacts with them on the same level. She is just as scantily clad as they are. Lily Allen, however, stays fully covered in her video, does not dance provocatively, and thus contrasts her own pure and respectable femininity with the Black women, using their twerking and scantily clad bodies as an example of “bad” female sexuality and femininity—of women “objectifying themselves.” This is racist because it frames Black female sexuality as lesser than white femininity and antithetical to feminism.
In summary: Nicki’s video is very much a celebration of female Black beauty and sexuality coming from a Black woman. Conversely, Lilly Allen’s is using Black women as props to frame them as a vile or bad form of sexuality or being too sexual to prop up her own feminism.
So you might say, “what about Miley Cyrus? she twerks along side her Black background dancers too!” But here’s the problem: Miley Cyrus continually appropriates Black culture and also uses Black women as props. It does matter that these artists are white because in these cases the point of including the Black women is either to, in Lily Allen’s case, offset Black sexuality/femininity as too sexual or bad in comparison with her white femininity/feminism, or, in the case of Miley Cyrus, to get “street cred” and exotify her own sexuality by appropriating Black culture and using Black people as props to do so. See this analysis of Lily Allen’s Hard Out Here video and this analysis of Miley Cyrus by Black people who know a lot more about this than I do.
I haven’t seen anything about Katy Perry using Black dancers. I’ve just seen criticisms of her appropriating AAVE and other PoC cultures. So I’m not sure why you brought her up, but maybe I just haven’t seen the videos in question.
Either way, it’s not like white artists having a diverse cast of back up dancers is a bad thing automatically. Here is an example of a white artist using back up dancers of other races without objectifying them: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Ilh1ewceco (notice this artist tackles the same issue as Lily Allen—sexism/objectification in the media—without being misogynist and racist toward other women). But the examples of Lily Allen and Miley Cyrus ARE racist and Nicki Minaj’s video isn’t the same as theirs.

I believe both opinions show good points but I dislike how criticising you are towards Lily Allen. Her song ‘Hard Out Here’ is one of the few songs that advocate the importance of feminism. Quote “don’t need to shake my ass FOR YOU cause I have a brain” implying that she will not shake her ass to please a man. Meaning of a pimp: a man who controls prostitutes and arranges clients for them, taking percentage of their earnings in return. A pimp could be anyone of any race and it looks as if you’re just assuming they are black which if I’m not mistaken, is racist? “
Lily Allen is dressed in tight clothes that society would still look down on, there might be many various reasons as to why she doesn’t want to show off her body due to maybe self esteem issues, you don’t know the reason and tbh if you didn’t see, she was shaking her ass just as much as the others (which weren’t all black, there were various cultures in the group of women). 
When the man comes in to tell them how to twerk, she turns the lyrics around and sings sarcastically about how women should look/do to please men. “If you can’t detect the sarcasm you’re misunderstood.” 
As for Nicki Minaj’s video - I don’t really approve of the whole jungle theme she’s got going on in her video clip that reminds us women could be portrayed as animals.. but otherwise, it is nice to see a woman of demand and who takes control of her life even though the crawling to drake could have looked a little demeaning.

What amazes me here is that all of this was addressed & you assume that your need to defend Lily Allen & disapprove of Nicki Minaj is happening in a vacuum. Way to make theroguefeminist’s point!

karnythia:

gonna-do-not-wanna-do:

theroguefeminist:

elliedoh:

So when Miley Cyrus or Katy Perry bring black girls on stage, dance with them, acknowledge their figures- it’s offensive and appropriating. But, when Nicki Minaj makes an entire video focusing around black girl’s asses and asserts her power, reduces these women to objects and flaunts her authority it’s YAAASSSSS NICKI SERVE IT. Is that because she’s black? So it’s okay for people of the same race to dance with each other but someone who does not share the same levels of melanin enters the picture, they’re doing something wrong? …idgi 

You’re completely ignoring context. In Lily Allen’s Hard out Here video, she literally says, “I don’t shake my ass cause I have a brain” as Black women shake their asses in her video. She is literally degrading the Black women who shake their asses in the media. The song also uses references to Black rappers (i.e. the title of the song referencing the rap song “Hard out Here for a Pimp” and her lyric “bragging ‘bout my cars or talking ‘bout my chains”), suggesting that Black rappers are more sexist than white male musicians (which isn’t true, there’s lots of sexism in all music genres) and also suggest the source of sexism in the music industry is Black people (Black male rappers and twerking Black female dancers).

In contrast, Nicki Minaj is reclaiming a song (Baby Got Back) that was made by a Black male rapper who celebrated (but also objectified) Black female bodies. Throughout her song, Nicki raps like a man would, talking about her sexual conquests with men and the size of their dicks, almost as a way of doing to men what they have done to women (objectifying their dicks as Sir Mix A Lot objectified Black women’s asses and many other men objectify women’s vaginas). She also brags about her sexual prowess and stays in control and aggressive in the video (she goes as far as cutting a banana representing a dick and slapping Drake’s hand away—the video critiques the male gaze). The target of mockery and disparagement in Nicki’s video is men and the male gaze, and the video works to reclaim agency from it.

In what way is Nicki asserting power over her dancers? In her video, she twerks along side her back up dancers and dances with them and interacts with them on the same level. She is just as scantily clad as they are. Lily Allen, however, stays fully covered in her video, does not dance provocatively, and thus contrasts her own pure and respectable femininity with the Black women, using their twerking and scantily clad bodies as an example of “bad” female sexuality and femininity—of women “objectifying themselves.” This is racist because it frames Black female sexuality as lesser than white femininity and antithetical to feminism.

In summary: Nicki’s video is very much a celebration of female Black beauty and sexuality coming from a Black woman. Conversely, Lilly Allen’s is using Black women as props to frame them as a vile or bad form of sexuality or being too sexual to prop up her own feminism.

So you might say, “what about Miley Cyrus? she twerks along side her Black background dancers too!” But here’s the problem: Miley Cyrus continually appropriates Black culture and also uses Black women as props. It does matter that these artists are white because in these cases the point of including the Black women is either to, in Lily Allen’s case, offset Black sexuality/femininity as too sexual or bad in comparison with her white femininity/feminism, or, in the case of Miley Cyrus, to get “street cred” and exotify her own sexuality by appropriating Black culture and using Black people as props to do so. See this analysis of Lily Allen’s Hard Out Here video and this analysis of Miley Cyrus by Black people who know a lot more about this than I do.

I haven’t seen anything about Katy Perry using Black dancers. I’ve just seen criticisms of her appropriating AAVE and other PoC cultures. So I’m not sure why you brought her up, but maybe I just haven’t seen the videos in question.

Either way, it’s not like white artists having a diverse cast of back up dancers is a bad thing automatically. Here is an example of a white artist using back up dancers of other races without objectifying them: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Ilh1ewceco (notice this artist tackles the same issue as Lily Allen—sexism/objectification in the media—without being misogynist and racist toward other women). But the examples of Lily Allen and Miley Cyrus ARE racist and Nicki Minaj’s video isn’t the same as theirs.

I believe both opinions show good points but I dislike how criticising you are towards Lily Allen. Her song ‘Hard Out Here’ is one of the few songs that advocate the importance of feminism. Quote “don’t need to shake my ass FOR YOU cause I have a brain” implying that she will not shake her ass to please a man. Meaning of a pimp: a man who controls prostitutes and arranges clients for them, taking percentage of their earnings in return. A pimp could be anyone of any race and it looks as if you’re just assuming they are black which if I’m not mistaken, is racist? “

Lily Allen is dressed in tight clothes that society would still look down on, there might be many various reasons as to why she doesn’t want to show off her body due to maybe self esteem issues, you don’t know the reason and tbh if you didn’t see, she was shaking her ass just as much as the others (which weren’t all black, there were various cultures in the group of women). 

When the man comes in to tell them how to twerk, she turns the lyrics around and sings sarcastically about how women should look/do to please men. “If you can’t detect the sarcasm you’re misunderstood.” 

As for Nicki Minaj’s video - I don’t really approve of the whole jungle theme she’s got going on in her video clip that reminds us women could be portrayed as animals.. but otherwise, it is nice to see a woman of demand and who takes control of her life even though the crawling to drake could have looked a little demeaning.

What amazes me here is that all of this was addressed & you assume that your need to defend Lily Allen & disapprove of Nicki Minaj is happening in a vacuum. Way to make theroguefeminist’s point!

iwilleatyourenglish:

everyone has said and done problematic things in their lifetime. that’s a result of the society we live in, not necessarily a reflection of their character.

what is a reflection of their character is how they react to being informed of the negativity within their behavior and statements, and whether or not they choose to change their behavior.

(via soupytwists)

The small city of Jennings, Mo., had a police department so troubled, and with so much tension between white officers and black residents, that the city council finally decided to disband it. Everyone in the Jennings police department was fired. New officers were brought in to create a credible department from scratch.

That was three years ago. One of the officers who worked in that department, and lost his job along with everyone else, was a young man named Darren Wilson.

j4ya:

when all the white friends in your squad know their boundaries

image

(via ethiopienne)

Besides Michael Brown, Whom Else Does The New York Times Call “No Angel”?

zuky:

Here’s who comes up in Vanity Fair’s search of people the New York Times has called “no angel”:

  • Al Capone, white mobster
  • James “Whitey” Bulger, white convicted murderer
  • Donald Manuel Paradis, white motorcycle gangster on death row
  • Erwin Rommel, Nazi field marshal
  • Clayton Lockett, white convicted murderer and rapist
  • Larry Flint, white pornographer
  • Eric Harris, white Columbine serial killer

Who else does the Times label “no angel”?

  • Samuel Spencer, Black victim of murder by four white men
  • Magic Johnson, Black basketball player
  • Michael Jackson, Black musician

Yeah. You do the math.

(via jessehimself)

We do not grow absolutely, chronologically. We grow sometimes in one dimension, and not in another; unevenly. We grow partially. We are relative. We are mature in one realm, childish in another. The past, present, and future mingle and pull us backward, forward, or fix us in the present. We are made up of layers, cells, constellations.

Anais Nin

(via balidomalido)

(via ethiopienne)